Skip to main content

Handmaid's Tale: Home

Library resources for Margaret Atwood's, Handmaid's Tale

Overview

The Handmaid's Tale

Date: 1985
Author: Margaret Atwood
From: The Handmaid's Tale, Bloom's Guides.

Margaret Atwood's controversial, feminist dystopian novel, The Handmaid's Tale(1984), features the ruminations of a female prisoner in Gilead—a theocratic dictatorship that evolves, in the near future, within America's borders. This oppressive regime measures a woman's worth solely by her reproductive capabilities (adhering to a "biology as destiny" philosophy), and women are not allowed to read, write, hold property, or have a job. In this way, Atwood deliberately magnifies and exaggerates the tradition-based ideology of America's religious right, or moral majority of the early 1980's, so as to scrutinize possible social consequences.

Databases A-Z

A-Z Database List

Full list of Databases the library subscribes to, including trial access.
Go to A-Z List

Databases

Social Studies Databases

eBooks

The Handmaid's Tale in Context: Feminism

The Plagiarism Spectrum

Find a Book!

Find
Search Titles Search Authors Search Subjects Search Keywords Search Series
Or go to Destiny...

Books

The Handmaid's Tale First-Look Teaser (Official)

Google Scholar

Google Scholar Search

Web Sites

Annotated Bibliographies

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY An annotated bibliography is a listing of the resources consulted for research purposes. An annotated bibliography is listed in alphabetical order according to author and contains the following information in this order.

i. Citation in MLA format

ii. Summary of the sources’ content (See sample below.)

Castelvecchi, D. (2008, August 30). “Carbon Tubes leave nano behind.” Science News, 174(5), Retrieved from http://www.sciencenews.org.

 This source, which describes a new, flexible lightweight material 30 times stronger than Keviar and possibly useful for better bulletproof vests, provides evidence of yet another upcoming technology that might be useful to law enforcement. This article focuses on the ways in which lighter, stronger, bulletproof materials might change SWAT tactics, for instance, enabling them to carry more gear, protect police vehicles, or to blend into crowds better. 

Research Tools

In-Text and Parenthetical Citations